Linkages between motivation, self-efficacy, self-regulated learning and preferences for traditional learning environments or those with an online component

Daniel Auld, Fran C. Blumberg, & Karen Clayton
Published Online: Oct 15, 2010
Abstract | References | Full Text: HTML, PDF (712 KB)

References

Allen, M., Mabry, E., Mattrey, M., Bourhis, J., Titsworth, S., & Burrell, N. (2004). Evaluating the effectiveness of distance learning: A comparison using meta-analysis. International Communication Association, 402-420.

Ames, C. (1992). Achievement goals and the classroom motivational climate.  In D. H. Schunk & J. L. Meece (Eds.), Student perceptions in the classroom (pp. 327-348).  Hillsdale: Lawrence Erlbaum.

Bandura, A. (1977). Social learning theory. Englewood Cliffs: Prentice Hall.

Bassili, J.N. (2006). Promotion and prevention orientations in the choice to attend lectures or watch them online. Journal of Computer Assisted Learning, 22, 444-455.

Blumberg, F. C., Rosenthal, S. F., & Randall, J. D. (2008). Impasse-driven learning in the context of video games. Computer in Human Behavior, 24, 1530-1541.

Clayton, K., Blumberg, F., & Auld, D. (2010). The relationship between motivation, learning strategies and choice of environment whether traditional or including an online component. British Journal of Educational Technology, 41, 349-64.

Csikszentmihalyi, M. (1988). The flow experience and its significance for human psychology. In M. Csikszentmihalyi & I. S. Csikszentmihalyi, (Eds.), Optimal Experience: Psychological Studies of Flow in Consciousness (pp. 15-35). Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.

Csikszentmihalyi, M. (1990). Flow the Psychology of Optimal Experience. New York: Harper & Row.

Dweck, C., & Leggett, E. (1988). A social-cognitive approach to motivation and personality. Psychological Review, 95, 256-273.

Harackiewicz, J. M., Barron, K. E., Pintrich, P. R., Elliot, A. J., & Thrash, T. M. (2002). Revision of achievement goal theory: Necessary and illuminating. Journal of Educational Psychology, 94(3), 638-645.

Katz, Y.J. (2002). Attitudes affecting college students’ preferences for distance learning. Journal of Computer Assisted Learning, 18, 2-9.

Keller, J. & Parry, M. (2010, May 9). University of California considers online classes, or even degrees. The Chronicle of Higher Education. Retrieved from http://chronicle.com/article/In-Crisis-U-of-California/65445/.

Liao, L. (2006). A flow theory perspective on learner motivation and behavior in distance education. Distance Education, 27(1), 45-62.

Midgley, C., Maehr, M. L., Hruda, L. Z., Anderman, E., Anderman, L., Freeman, K. E., Gheen, M., Kaplan, A., Kumar, R., Middelton, M. J., Nelson, J., Roeser, R., & Urdan, T. (2000).  Manual for the Patterns of Adaptive Learning Scales.  Ann Arbor: University of Michigan.

Midgley, C., Kaplan, A., & Middleton, M. (2001). Performance-approach goals: Good for what, for whom, under what circumstances, and at what cost? Journal of Educational Psychology, 93(1), 77-86.

Müller, T. (2008). Persistence of women in online degree-completion programs. International Review in Open and Distance Learning, 9(2), 1-18.

Murphy, M. J., Levant, R. F., Hall, J. E., & Glueckauf, R. L. (2007). Distance education in professional training in psychology. Professional Psychology: Research and Practice, 38, 97-103.

Northrup, P. T. (2002). Online learners’ preferences for interaction. The Quarterly Review of Distance Education, 3(2), 219-226.

Pintrich, P. R. (2003). A motivational science perspective on the role of student motivation in learning and teaching contexts. Journal of Educational Psychology, 95(4), 667-686.

Pintrich, P. R., Smith, D. A. F., Garcia, T., & McKeachie, W. J. (1991). A Manual for the Use of the Motivated Strategies for Learning Questionnaire (MSLQ). Ann Arbor: National Center for Research to Improve Postsecondary Teaching and Learning.

Schunk, D., & Pajares, F. (2002). The development of academic self-efficacy.  In A. Wigfield & J. Eccles (Eds.), Development of achievement motivation (pp. 15-31). San Diego: Academic Press.

Shin, N.  (2006). Online learner’s ‘flow’ experience: an empirical study. British Journal of Educational Technology, 37(5), 705-720.

Shuster, G. F., Demerth Learn, C., & Duncan, R. (2003). A strategy for involving on-campus and distance students in a nursing research course. The Journal of Continuing Education in Nursing, 34(3), 108-115.

Williams, J. A.  (2010, April 29). Government Is Urged to Bankroll Grad Students Toward Degrees. The Chronicle of Higher Education. Retrieved from http://chronicle.com/article/Government-Is-Urged-to-Bank/65286/.

Zimmerman, B. J. (1989). A social cognitive view of self-regulated academic learning. Journal of Educational Psychology, 81(3), 329-339.

Zimmerman, B. J., & Martinez-Pons, M. (1986). Development of a structured interview for assessing student use of self-regulated learning strategies. American Educational Research Journal, 23, 614-628.

Zimmerman, B. J., & Martinez-Pons, M. (1988). Construct validation of a strategy model of student self-regulated learning. Journal of Educational Psychology, 80(3) 284-290.


Comments are closed.


Digital Culture & Education (DCE) is an international inter-disciplinary peer-reviewed journal dedicated to the exploration of digital technology’s impacts on identity, education, art, society, culture and narrative within social, political, economic, cultural and historical contexts.

We are interested in empirical and conceptual approaches to theorising globalisation, development, sustainability, wellbeing, subjectivities, networks, new media, gaming, multimodality, literacies and related issues and their implications for how we educate and why. We encourage submissions in a variety of modes and invite guest editors to propose special editions.

DCE is an online, open access journal. It does not charge for article submission or for publication. All manuscripts submitted to DCE are double blind reviewed. Articles are published through a Creative Commons (CC) License and made available for viewing and download on a bespoke page at www.digitalcultureandeducation.com

 

Follow us on Twitter at @DigitalCultureE


The scale and speed at which digital culture has entered all aspects of our lives is unprecedented. We publish articles and digital works including eBooks (published under Creative Commons Licenses) that address the use of digital (and other) technologies and how they are taken up across diverse institutional and non-institutional contexts. Scholarly reviews of books, conferences, exhibits, games, software and hardware are also encouraged.

All manuscripts submitted to Digital Culture & Education (DCE) are double-blind reviewed where the identity of the reviewers and the authors are not disclosed to either party.

Digital Culture & Education (DCE) does not have article submission charges. Read more


Manuscripts should include:
1. Cover sheet with author(s) contact details and brief biographical statement(s).

Instructions for Authors

Manuscripts submitted should be original, not under review by any other publication and not published elsewhere.
The expected word count for submissions to the journal is approximately 7500 words, excluding references. Each paper should be accompanied by an abstract of up to 200 words.  Authors planning to submit manuscripts significantly longer than 7500 words should first contact the Editor at editor@digitalcultureandeducation.com

All pages should be numbered. Footnotes to the text should be avoided and endnotes should be used instead. Sponsorship of research reported (e.g. by research councils, government departments and agencies, etc.) should be declared.

Read more


Digital Culture & Education (DCE) invites submissions on any aspect of digital culture and education.  We welcome submissions of articles and digital works that address the use of digital (and other) technologies and how they are taken up across diverse institutional and non-institutional contexts. For further inquiries and submission of work, send an email to editor@ digitalcultureandeducation.com